Doubt Thou Stars Are Fire

raishe:

You are an amazing person!

You are extremely loved, even if you do not realize it right now.

Someone is always here for you when you need them.

You are a beautiful human being that adds color and flavor to the world.

You are unique and have special little quirks that might not be as…

Thoughts on storytelling - or whatever…

I love my characters and their stories - filled with romance, adventure, independence, good winning over evil, fluff and happy endings… but I also love pushing them to the edge of despair or plain just throwing them off the cliff, maiming them body and soul, killing their friends, family and sometimes even the character altogether, and destroying them to the point where they just couldn’t exist anymore. I CAN’T HELP MYSELF. Yes a character with a fluffy story is sweet, but to see a character claw themselves from the depths of the netherworld makes them interesting. Any character can be made of sugar that triumphs over evil every time and still be good, but a character that walks through the flames losing everything they once loved and still keeps their sense of ‘what is right’ is fantastic.

drain-your-bloodlust:

drain-your-bloodlust:

I have been waiting for this. Praise the angel who made this post.

drain-your-bloodlust:

drain-your-bloodlust:

I have been waiting for this. Praise the angel who made this post.

daddyslittleangelxo:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]


Also the 4,7,8 breathing method helps a lot!! Breathe in for 4 seconds, hold for 7 and release for 8, and repeat as needed until they feel better. This has done wonders for me even when I’m not having a panic attack. To quote an earlier reblog about this breathing method “It causes an autonomic nervous system shift from a sympathetic (fight or flight reaction) state, to a parasympathetic response.” In laymans terms, by breathing this way, you go from that “oh god oh god oh god I have to get out of here NOW” sick feeling to “I’m ok, I didn’t die, I’ll be ok, I was able to handle that, I’m ok, I’m ok, I am okay.” calm feeling.  It has even worked for me when I have had close calls while driving on the freeway and my body tries to panic even though the danger has passed.Also, one thing I have noticed that helps for me is stretching afterwards. I’m not sure if it’s to release tension in my muscles (idk about y’all but intense up all over when I panic), or to get rid of that claustrophobic feeling by letting the body feel for itself that it’s not trapped or enclosed at all, or both, or for an entirely different reason. Some people prefer a cold glass of water to drink, others try to avoid putting anything on their stomachs at all. The main thing is, don’t be afraid to make yourself as comfortable and at ease as possible. This goes for anyone handling a panic attack, make sure that person is totally at ease as best as you can. Don’t be afraid to offer that person some water or a blanket or what have you, but don’t be surprised if they turn it down, it may not make them comfortable, so don’t push it on them either. Let them absorb what happened, work through it, and deal with it in whatever way they feel the most comfortable. Just be there, be present for them, be available, but don’t hover, unless that’s what they ask of you.

daddyslittleangelxo:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

Also the 4,7,8 breathing method helps a lot!! Breathe in for 4 seconds, hold for 7 and release for 8, and repeat as needed until they feel better. This has done wonders for me even when I’m not having a panic attack. To quote an earlier reblog about this breathing method “It causes an autonomic nervous system shift from a sympathetic (fight or flight reaction) state, to a parasympathetic response.” In laymans terms, by breathing this way, you go from that “oh god oh god oh god I have to get out of here NOW” sick feeling to “I’m ok, I didn’t die, I’ll be ok, I was able to handle that, I’m ok, I’m ok, I am okay.” calm feeling. It has even worked for me when I have had close calls while driving on the freeway and my body tries to panic even though the danger has passed.

Also, one thing I have noticed that helps for me is stretching afterwards. I’m not sure if it’s to release tension in my muscles (idk about y’all but intense up all over when I panic), or to get rid of that claustrophobic feeling by letting the body feel for itself that it’s not trapped or enclosed at all, or both, or for an entirely different reason. Some people prefer a cold glass of water to drink, others try to avoid putting anything on their stomachs at all. The main thing is, don’t be afraid to make yourself as comfortable and at ease as possible. This goes for anyone handling a panic attack, make sure that person is totally at ease as best as you can. Don’t be afraid to offer that person some water or a blanket or what have you, but don’t be surprised if they turn it down, it may not make them comfortable, so don’t push it on them either. Let them absorb what happened, work through it, and deal with it in whatever way they feel the most comfortable. Just be there, be present for them, be available, but don’t hover, unless that’s what they ask of you.

charlesoberonn:

"And then I saw her face" gets a whole new meaning when you read it in present tense

Purple: 10 facts about my room.
Blue: 9 facts about my family.
Green: 8 facts about my body
Yellow: 7 facts about my childhood
Orange: 6 facts about my home town.
Red: 5 facts about my bestfriend(s).
Pink: 4 facts about my parents.
White: 3 facts about my personality.
Grey: 2 facts about my favourite things
Black: 1 fact about the person I like.

curvier:

my life:

  • in the morning, i can’t wake up
  • in the night, i can’t sleep
mexicanthighs:

more like *but that requires an actual bra and not a sports bra

mexicanthighs:

more like *but that requires an actual bra and not a sports bra

catskid100:

From now on Im going to speak like an anime protagonist giving an inspirational speech, because….. *clenches fist* because there are people who believe in me! People who are constantly giving me strength! And even if they’re not with me right now…. *faint smile at the ground*…. They’re always sending  me their wishes a-and I want to be able to give them courage too!!!!

Dash did a thing… reality man…
And Phill Lewis.

Dash did a thing… reality man…

And Phill Lewis.

cranapplejuiceadvocate:

me whispering to my dog in the dark: hey.. you still up?

Then remembering I don’t have a dog… but something still licks my hand hanging off the bed.

Hey! Happy birthday, Ben and Jared!

I saw this and I automatically thought of Ben & Jerry’s…

thegenderqueeralchemist:

bisexual and pansexual people are actually made of stardust and flames and are immortal pass it on

Have a wonderful wedding at any age. “Happy Wedding” A new magazine.